Words starting with ” a ” for SAT, GRE, GMAT, CAT skmclasses Bangalore

Aardwolf South African carnivorous fox-like quadruped

2 aardwolf South African carnivorous fox-like quadruped

Aasvogel South African vulture

2 aasvogel South African vulture

aba garment of camel or goat hair; camel or goat-hair fabric

2 aba garment of camel or goat hair camel or goat-hair fabric

Abacinate – to blind by putting red-hot copper basin near the eyes

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abacinate is at

https://vocabulary4satgrecat.wordpress.com/words-starting-with-a/abacinate-to-blind-by-putting-red-hot-copper-basin-near-the-eyes/

Abactor cattle thief

6 abactor cattle thief skmclasses Bangalore

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abactor is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abactor-cattle-thief/

abaculus small tile for mosaic

6 abaculus small tile for mosaic skmclasses Bangalore

abaft toward or at the stern of a ship; further aft

6 abaft toward or at the stern of a ship skmclasses

abampere unit equivalent to 10 amperes

Abapical – at the lowest point

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abapical is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abapical-at-the-lowest-point/

Abarticular not connected with the joint

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abarticular is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abarticular-not-connected-with-the-joint/


Abase – v- to lower physically. to lower in rank, office, prestige, or esteem. ” I certainly don’t abase myself when I do good, honest manual labor.”
” was unwilling to abase himself by pleading guilty to a crime that he did not commit”. Middle English abassen, from Anglo-French abesser, abaisser, from a- (from Latin ad-) + -besser, from Vulgar Latin *bassiare to lower.

Synonyms
debase, bastardize, canker, cheapen, corrupt, debauch, degrade, demean, demoralize, deprave, deteriorate, lessen, pervert, poison, profane, prostitute, subvert, vitiate, warp

Antonyms
elevate, ennoble, uplift

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abase is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abase-cause-to-feel-shame-hurt-the-pride-of/

abasement action of humbling or degrading

abasia inability to walk due to lack of muscular coordination

6 abasia inability to walk due to lack of muscular coordination

Abask in genial warmth

10 abask in genial warmth skmclasses Bangalore

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abask is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abask-in-genial-warmth/

abatis rampart of felled trees and branches

12 abatis rampart of felled trees and branches

abatjour skylight or device to direct light into a room

6 abatjour skylight or device to direct light into a room

abattoir public slaughterhouse

12 abattoir public slaughterhouse skmclasses Bangalore

abature trail through wood beaten down by a stag

6 abature trail through wood beaten down by a stag skmclasses

abb yarn used for warp

12 abb yarn used for warp skmclasses Bangalore

abba Syriac or Coptic bishop

15 abba Syriac or Coptic bishop

Abbatial of, like or pertaining to abbots or an abbey

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abbatial is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abbatial-of-like-or-pertaining-to-abbots-or-an-abbey/

abbozzo preliminary sketch

16 abbozzo preliminary sketch

abdicate – to leave the position of being a king or queen. To fail to do what is required by (a duty or responsibility). to cast off : discard. to relinquish (as sovereign power) formally. To renounce a throne, high office, dignity, or function. The king was forced to abdicate. The king abdicated the throne. Latin abdicatus, past participle of abdicare, from ab- + dicare to proclaim — more at diction.

abditive remote; secret; hidden

8 abditive remote secret hidden skmclasses

abdominous having a paunch or big belly

42 Fat doctor with tummy skmclasses Bangalore

abducent turning away; bearing away from

12 abducent turning away; bearing away from

abeam in a line at right angles to the length of a vessel, on the beam

abear to bear; to comport; to behave

15 abear to bear to comport to behave fighting

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abear is at

https://nicewemen.wordpress.com/abear/

abecedarian of, like or pertaining to the order of the alphabet; rudimentary

abecedism word created from the initials of words in a phrase

abele white poplar tree

16 abele white poplar tree

abeng Jamaican bugle made from cow horn

16 abeng Jamaican bugle made from cow horn

aberdevine alternate name for the siskin

16 aberdevine alternate name for the siskin

aberuncators long tool for pruning tall branches

17 aberuncators long tool for pruning tall branches

abessive indicating absence or lack

abiectic of, like or pertaining to fir trees or fir sap

16 Fir trees

abigail a lady’s maid

17 abigail a ladys maid

abigeus cattle rustler

16 abigeus cattle rustler thief steals cattle

abiogenesis spontaneous generation of living matter

abiotrophy degeneration; loss of physical vitality or ability

abirritate to alleviate irritation; to reduce sensitivity

abiturient pupil leaving school for university

17 abiturient pupil leaving school for university

abject humble; miserable; craven
Abject – If it reeks of humiliation or looks like the lowest of lows, then you can safely describe it as abject. The pronunciation of abject is up for debate: you can decide whether to stress the first or the second syllable. But what’s more important is understanding how extreme this adjective is. Abject means absolutely miserable, the most unfortunate, with utter humiliation. You might have heard the phrase abject poverty, which is the absolute worst, most hopeless level of poverty you’ve ever seen. extremely bad or severe. very humble : feeling or showing shame. very weak : lacking courage or strength. sunk to or existing in a low state or condition.

cast down in spirit : servile, spiritless. showing hopelessness or resignation. expressing or offered in a humble and often ingratiating spirit. They live in abject misery.
He offered an abject apology.
She thought he was an abject coward.

Middle English, from Latin abjectus, from past participle of abicere to cast off, from ab- + jacere to throw
Synonyms
base, humble, menial, servile, slavish


abjure – (v.) to reject, renounce (To prove his honesty, the president abjured the evil policies of his wicked predecessor.) Abjure means to swear off, and it applies to something you once believed. You can abjure a religious faith, you can abjure your love of another person, and you can abjure the practice of using excessive force in interrogation.

Abjure is a more dramatic way to declare your rejection of something you once felt or believed. When you see its Latin roots, it makes sense: from ab-(meaning “away”) and jurare (“to swear”). When you abjure something, you swear it away and dissociate yourself with it. You might abjure the field of astrology after receiving a bad fortune, or you might abjure marriage after a bitter divorce.

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abjure is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abjure-formally-reject-or-disavow-a-formerly-held-belief-usually-under-pressure/

ablactation weaning of a child from its mother’s milk

ablative indicating direction from or time when

ablator thermal protection on outside of spacecraft

ablaut variation in root vowel of words to change meaning

ablegate papal envoy or legate

ablepsia blindness

ablow in a blowing state

abluent cleanser or cleansing product

Ablution ritual washing

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Ablution is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/ablution-the-ritual-washing-of-a-priests-hands-or-of-sacred-vessels-a-toilet-that-is-available-to-the-public/

ablutomania mania for washing oneself

Abnegate – to renounce or repudiate

Abnegation – When you purposely deny yourself something, especially in favor of the needs of others, you would describe this act as an abnegation. This has to be your choice, not the choice of others — so it’s not abnegation when your parents don’t let you stay out all night.

The noun abnegation definitely has the sense of self-denial and self-sacrifice. So you wouldn’t use abnegation to refer to the fact that you are giving up candy in order to eat more fruit. You might also use the word if you are giving up dessert so that you can donate to charity all the money you saved by not eating them for a month or two. Some religions have fast days and you would definitely use abnegation if you’ve given up all food or something you like to eat in order to follow the rules and requirements of your beliefs.
denial; especially : self-denial
The couple’s sudden abnegation of life in the fast lane for work as missionaries stunned everyone
Late Latin abnegation-, abnegatio, from Latin abnegare to refute, from ab- + negare to deny

abnegate-to-renounce-or-repudiate

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abnegate is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abnegate-deny-or-renounce/


abodement an omen; a foretelling

aboideau tide gate

abolla Roman military cloak

abomasum ruminant’s fourth stomach

aboral away from the mouth

abord to accost; to approach

aborning during birth; while being born

aborticide killing of a fetus; abortion

abortuary anti-abortion term for an abortion clinic


Aboulia loss of ability to make decisions

Aboulia loss of ability to make decisions
Aboulia loss of ability to make decisions

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Aboulia is at
https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/aboulia-loss-of-ability-to-make-decisions/

Aboulomania – pathological indecisiveness

aboutsledge largest blacksmith’s hammer

abra narrow mountain pass

abradant a substance that abrades

abraid to awaken or rouse

Abrasive –

Sharply disagreeable; rigorous. “an abrasive character”. A substance that abrades or wears down. Causing abrasion. abradant

Abrasive

abrasive (adjective), more abrasive, most abrasive)
1. Harsh, irritating, or caustic: The politician’s abrasive remarks angered the audience with some of them yelling their own abrasive comments back at him.
2. Describing something that scrapes; rough or scratchy: William was advised to use sandpaper or some other abrasive material to remove the paint from the chairs before painting them again.

The abrasive effect of sandpaper on the wood made it smooth and easy to paint on.
3. A reference to something that is harsh, irritating, or rude: When the talk-show host used abrasive remarks, he insulted many in his radio audience.

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abrasive is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abrasive-sharply-disagreeable-rigorous/

abraxas gem engraved with mystical word and bearing human-animal figure

abreuvoir joint or gap between two stones in masonry

abroach in a condition to allow liquor to run out

Abrogate – (v.) to abolish, usually by authority (The Bill of Rights assures that the government cannot abrogate our right to a free press.)
abrogate – Abrogate means to abolish or avoid. When someone cuts in front of you in line, they are abrogating your right to be the next one served. When you cut in line, you are abrogating your responsibility to those who were in line before you.

The Latin root of this word is made up of the prefix ab- “away” and rogare “to propose a law.” What does it mean if you propose a law away? You repeal it, of course, so abrogate means to officially revoke, cancel or abolish. The meaning of this word has expanded a bit since its earliest usage, but it still appears most often in a legal or political context, or when serious rights and responsibilities are being discussed.

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abrogate is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abrogate-revoke-formally/

Abrosia fasting

abscind to pare, reduce, cut off or away

abscissa horizontal distance from a fixed line to a point

abscission cutting off; cutting away

absconce lantern used in monasteries and night offices

abseil to descend a rock face using a double rope

absentaneous done in absence; pertaining to absence

absinthial of, like or pertaining to wormwood; bitter

absinthism disease resembling alcoholism

absit leave to pass one night away from college

Absolute – (adjective) (not comparable)

Absolute

1. Perfect in quality or nature; free from imperfection; complete, perfect: Glenn described his lady friend as an example of absolute perfection.
2. Not mixed or adulterated; pure: Chad’s story was an absolute lie.
3. Not limited by restrictions or exceptions; unconditional, complete, outright: total trust: Earl told Diane that she has his absolute confidence.
4. Unqualified in extent or degree; total: Marie could hear a pin drop in the absolute silence of the room.
5. Unconstrained by constitutional, a counterbalancing group, or other provisions, etc. in the exercise of governmental power; especially, when arbitrary or despotic: James was an absolute ruler in his position as the absolute monarch.
6. Not to be doubted or questioned; positive, certain: The police have absolute proof of Philip’s guilt.
7. Relating to measurements or units of measurement derived from fundamental units of length, mass, and time: The laboratory was supplied with the necessary equipment to measure the absolute temperature of the liquids.
8. Complete and unconditional; final: Deborah declared that the current novel is the absolute end of her career as a writer.
9. Noting or pertaining to the scale of a grading system based on an individual’s performance considered as representing his or her knowledge of a given subject regardless of the performance of others in a group: Jessica’s absolute performance during the year qualifies her for the special graduation honors.
10. Etymology: from Latin absolutus and absolvere, “to set free, to make separate”.

Logically, absolute terms cannot be compared, as with “more” and “most”, or used with an “intensive modifier”; such as, “very” or “so” because something either is complete or it is not. It cannot be “more complete” than something else; consequently, sentences; such as, “Mike wanted to make his record collection more complete”, and “Joyce can improve the sketch by making the lines more perpendicular”, are often criticized as being illogical.

1. Perfect in quality or nature; free from imperfection; complete, perfect: Glenn described his lady friend as an example of absolute perfection.
2. Not mixed or adulterated; pure: Chad’s story was an absolute lie.
3. Not limited by restrictions or exceptions; unconditional, complete, outright: total trust: Earl told Diane that she has his absolute confidence.
4. Unqualified in extent or degree; total: Marie could hear a pin drop in the absolute silence of the room.
5. Unconstrained by constitutional, a counterbalancing group, or other provisions, etc. in the exercise of governmental power; especially, when arbitrary or despotic: James was an absolute ruler in his position as the absolute monarch.
6. Not to be doubted or questioned; positive, certain: The police have absolute proof of Philip’s guilt.
7. Relating to measurements or units of measurement derived from fundamental units of length, mass, and time: The laboratory was supplied with the necessary equipment to measure the absolute temperature of the liquids.
8. Complete and unconditional; final: Deborah declared that the current novel is the absolute end of her career as a writer.
9. Noting or pertaining to the scale of a grading system based on an individual’s performance considered as representing his or her knowledge of a given subject regardless of the performance of others in a group: Jessica’s absolute performance during the year qualifies her for the special graduation honors.
10. Etymology: from Latin absolutus and absolvere, “to set free, to make separate”.

Logically, absolute terms cannot be compared, as with “more” and “most”, or used with an “intensive modifier”; such as, “very” or “so” because something either is complete or it is not. It cannot be “more complete” than something else; consequently, sentences; such as, “Mike wanted to make his record collection more complete”, and “Joyce can improve the sketch by making the lines more perpendicular”, are often criticized as being illogical.

Absolute – not comparable

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Absolute is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/absolute-not-comparable/

absolutism doctrine of government by a single absolute ruler; autocracy

absolutive indicating subject or object of intransitive verb

absolutory forgiving or absolving

Absonant – discordant; abhorrent

absonant discordant abhorrent

absorbefacient causing or promoting absorption

absorptiometer instrument for measuring solubility of gases in liquids

absquatulate to decamp; to leave quickly; to flee

abstemious – not eating and drinking too much.

Absterge wipe clean; expunge; purge; purify

Absterge wipe clean purge expunge purify

Abstinence – the practice of not doing or having something that is wanted or enjoyable : the practice of abstaining from something. voluntary forbearance especially from indulgence of an appetite or craving or from eating some foods. habitual abstaining from intoxicating beverages. abstention from sexual intercourse. The program promoted sexual abstinence for young people. a cleric vainly preaching abstinence in a world where self-indulgence is regarded as almost a virtue.
Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin abstinentia, from abstinent-, abstinens, present participle of abstinere
Synonyms
continence, self-abnegation, self-denial, sobriety, temperance

Antonyms
self-indulgence

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abstinence is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abstinence-act-or-practice-of-refraining-from-indulging-an-appetite/

abstinence – The trait of abstaining (especially from alcohol)

Abstinence

Abstracted – Lost in thought showing preoccupation

Abstracted – Consider a concept without thinking of a specific example; consider abstractly or theoretically. Make off with belongings of others. Consider apart from a particular case or instance. “Let’s abstract away from this particular example”. Give an abstract (of).

Abstracted

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abstracted is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abstracted-lost-in-thought-showing-preoccupation/

absurdism doctrine that we live in an irrational universe

abterminal going from the end inwards

abthane monastic region of the old Irish church

abuna Ethiopian patriarch

Abstruse – Abstruse things are difficult to understand because they are so deep and intellectually challenging. It might be hard to figure out how a toilet flushes but the technology that goes into making the Internet function is abstruse.

The Latin roots of the word abstruse are about concealing or hiding something, which is a good way to remember the meaning of this word. It is useful when describing something that is overly confusing, or if someone is deliberately making a story or a situation more complicated than necessary. It sounds and looks like obtuse, but abstruse is almost its opposite. Obtuse is dull or lacking a sharpness of intellect. While Abstruse is president of the chess club, Obtuse is hanging out by the parking lot smoking cigarettes.
abstruse – hard to understand. difficult to comprehend – recondite. Her subject matter is abstruse. Latin abstrusus, from past participle of abstrudere to conceal, from abs-, ab- + trudere to push.
Synonyms
profound, arcane, deep, esoteric, hermetic (also hermetical), recondite

Antonyms
shallow, superficial

 

Abstruse

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Abstruse is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/abstruse-difficult-to-penetrate-incomprehensible-to-one-of-ordinary-understanding-or-knowledge/


abusion misuse; outrage; deception

Abut – to touch along an edge. to touch along a border or with a projecting part. to terminate at a point of contact. to lean for support. to border on. to cause to abut. Their property and our property abut.

Middle English abutten, from Anglo-French aboter, abuter, partly from Old French aboter to border on, from a- (from Latin ad-) + bout blow, end, from boter to strike; partly from Old French abuter to come to an end, from a- + but end, aim

abutment masonry on a wall that supports an arch

abvolt unit of electrical potential equal to one hundred millionth of a volt

aby to make amends; atone; pay a penalty

Abyss – a hole so deep or a space so great that it cannot be measured. The bottomless gulf, pit, or chaos of the old cosmogonies. An immeasurably deep gulf or great space. Intellectual or moral depths. looking down at the dark ocean from the ship’s rail, the cruise passenger felt as though he was staring into an abyss. Middle English abissus, from Late Latin abyssus, from Greek abyssos, from abyssos, adjective, bottomless, from a- + byssos depth; perhaps akin to Greek bathys deep.
Synonyms
abysm, chasm, deep, gulf, ocean


abyssopelagic of, like or pertaining to the depths of the ocean


academicism doctrine that nothing can be known


acanaceous bearing prickles or thistles; prickly

acantha prickle

acanthous spiny; prickly

acapnia lack or deficiency of carbon dioxide

acapnotic non-smoker; non-smoking

acariasis irritating itching insect infestation


acaricide killer of mites and ticks

Acarine – of, like or pertaining to ticks or mites

Acarine woman Mite

acarology study of mites

acarophobia fear of itching or of insects causing itching

acarpous sterile; not bearing fruit

acatalectic having complete or full number of syllables in a poetic line

acatalepsy the unknowableness of all things to a certainty

acatamathesia inability to understand data presented to the senses

acates provisions that have been purchased

acatour provisioner; quartermaster

acaudate tailless

acaulescent having a very short stem

Accede – If you accede, it means you agree with someone or give in to his or her wish. The word is often used in a political context — the Queen acceded to the Prince’s demands for more territory, a larger army, and funnier jesters.

Accede can also be used for everyday situations. If you accede to your mother’s request that you come home before ten, it means you’ll be missing that midnight movie with your friends. Accede comes from the Latin accedere, meaning to “approach or enter upon.” It differs slightly from concede, which also means consent, but a more reluctant kind. If you were to concede to your mom’s 10 PM curfew rather than accede to it, you’d be doing so against your will.

Accede If you accede it means you agree with someone or give in to his or her wish

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Accede is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/accede-if-you-accede-it-means-you-agree-with-someone-or-give-in-to-his-or-her-wish/

Accelerometer instrument for measuring acceleration or vibrations

accend to kindle

accensor acolyte

accentor songbird

acceptilation remission of debt or liability through fictitious repayment

accessit prize for students in second place; honourable mention

acciaccatura very short note played before a longer one

accidence grammar book; science of inflections in grammar

accidentalism theory that events do not have causes

accidie sloth; physical torpor

accinge to gird

accipiter bandage worn around the nose

accipitral like a bird of prey; rapacious

Accipitrine – of, like or pertaining to falcons and hawks

Accipitrine woman naughty woman acting like Falcon

accismus in rhetoric, pretending to refuse something

accite to cite; to summon

acclinate sloping upwards


acclivity upward slope

9 uphill task skmclasses subhashish sir

acclivity – an ascending slope (as of a hill). The steep acclivity was especially daunting for the novice hikers. Latin acclivitas, from acclivis ascending, from ad- + clivus slope
Synonyms
ascent, hill, rise, upgrade, uphill, uprise

Antonyms
declension, decline, declivity, descent, dip, downgrade, downhill, drop-off, fall, hang, hanging

_
accloy to hobble with a horseshoe nail

accolade curved architectural moulding; vertical line joining two musical staves

accolent neighbouring

accollé of a heraldic animal, entwined or collared

accosted in heraldry, two figures placed side by side

accoucheur male midwife

accoucheuse female midwife

accourage to encourage

accourt to entertain

accoutre – to provide with equipment or furnishings, outfit. hikers accoutred with walking sticks, water bottles, trail maps, and compasses. French accoutrer, from Middle French acoustrer, from a- + costure seam, from Vulgar Latin *consutura. Synonyms
furnish (or accouter), equip, fit (out), gird, kit (up or out) [chiefly British], outfit, provision, rig, supply

_

accoy to subdue; to pacify; to soothe

accrementition increase or growth by adding similar material

accretion accumulation; addition of parts to form a whole

accretion –

The process of increasing can be called accretion. Although you may say that stalactites “grow” from the ceilings of caves, they actually form from an accretion of limestone and other minerals.

So what’s the difference between an addition and an accretion? Addition implies adding to something that already exists, such as an addition to the cast (when a new actor joins an existing show). The noun accretion, on the other hand, implies an accumulation that causes increase, such as “an accretion of

frost on the windows” or “an accretion of plaque on your teeth.” The latter, of course, is why the dentist always begs you to floss and brush.

a gradual process in which layers of a material are formed as small amounts are added over time. something that has grown or accumulated slowly : a product or result of gradual growth.

the process of growth or enlargement by a gradual buildup: as
a : increase by external addition or accumulation (as by adhesion of external parts or particles)
b : the increase of land by the action of natural forces a product of accretion; especially : an extraneous addition. rocks formed by the slow accretion of limestone. There was an accretion of ice on the car’s windshield.

Synonyms
accumulation, assemblage, collection, cumulation, cumulus, gathering, lodgment (or lodgement), pileup

Antonyms
abatement, decline, decrease, decrement, depletion, diminishment, diminution, drop-off, fall, falloff, lessening, loss, lowering, reduction, shrinkage, step-down

accubation reclining as on a couch

accubitum crescent-shaped couch

accusative indicating direct object of a verb

acedia listlessness; sloth

aceldama site or scene of violence or bloodshed

aceology therapeutics

acequia irrigation ditch

acerate of, like or resembling a needle

acerbate to embitter; to irritate

acerbic
(adj.) biting, bitter in tone or taste (Jill became extremely acerbic and began to cruelly make fun of all her friends.)
expressing harsh or sharp criticism in a clever way. acid in temper, mood, or tone. the film’s most acerbic critics.
Whitney has graced magazine covers for her acerbic and blunt evisceration of the banks she has covered. Several weeks ago, she left her well-paid post at Oppenheimer to start her own economic consultancy, where she will charge many of her employer’s clients for her own unambiguous analysis.
Synonyms
acerb, sarcastic, acid, acidic, acidulous, acrid, barbed, biting, caustic, corrosive, cutting, mordant, pungent, sardonic, satiric (or satirical), scalding, scathing, sharp, smart-aleck, smart-alecky, smart-mouthed, snarky, tart

acerous lacking horns or antennae

acersecomic one whose hair has never been cut

acervate heaped; clustered

acervuline like or in small mounds or heaps

acescence becoming sour; souring; turning of milk

acetabulum small anatomical cup or hollow, such as a sucker


acetarious referring to plants that are used in salads

acetimeter instrument for measuring strength of vinegar

achaenocarp any dry indehiscent fruit

acharné furious or desperate (of a battle)

achene small one-seeded fruit or naked seed of plant

achloropsia colour-blindness with respect to green

achor eruption or scab on the head

achromatopsia colour-blindness

achroous colourless

acicular needle-shaped

acidaemia undue acidity of blood

acidimeter instrument for measuring concentration of acids

acidulous sharp or bitter-tasting

acierate to turn into steel

acinaceous full of kernels

acinaciform scimitar-shaped

aciniform shaped like a berry

acinus berry which grows in clusters

acipenser sturgeon

ackamarackus pretentious or deceptive nonsense

aclinic having no inclination or magnetic dip


Acme – the highest point of something. the highest point or stage; also : one that represents perfection of the thing expressed. His fame was at its acme.
Synonyms
height, apex, apogee, capstone, climax, crescendo, crest, crown, culmination, head, high noon, high tide, high-water mark, meridian, ne plus ultra,

noon, noontime, peak, pinnacle, sum, summit, tip-top, top, zenith

Antonyms
bottom, nadir, rock bottom

acock defiantly

acoemeti ancient monastic order who maintained eternal choir service

acology study of medical remedies

acolous limbless

acolouthic of, like or pertaining to an after-image or other after-sensation

acopic curing or relieving fatigue

acoria pathologically great appetite

acosmism disbelief in existence of eternal universe distinct from God

acouasm ringing noise in head

acquest object which is acquired


acquiesce – to accept, agree, or allow something to happen by staying silent or by not arguing. To accept, comply, or submit tacitly or passively —often

used with in and sometimes with to.
They demanded it, and he acquiesced.apparently the contractor expected me to acquiesce to my own fleecing. French acquiescer, from Latin acquiescere, from ad- + quiescere to be quiet

acracy government by none; anarchy

acratia impotence

acre-breadth old unit of length of 22 yards

Acrid – bitter and unpleasant in taste or smell. sharp and harsh or unpleasantly pungent in taste or odor, irritating. Deeply or violently bitter, acrimonious. Thick, acrid smoke rose from the factory. there have been acrid relations between the two families ever since they fought over that strip of land. modification of Latin acr-, acer sharp.

acritochromacy colour-blindness

acroamatic esoteric

acrimony
(n.) bitterness, discord (Though they vowed that no girl would ever come between them, Biff and Trevor could not keep acrimony from overwhelming their friendship after they both fell in love with the lovely Teresa.)

acrimonious – angry and bitter. caustic, biting, or rancorous especially in feeling, language, or manner. He went through an acrimonious divorce. an acrimonious parting between the two former friends. Each man came out of their acrimonious 200-meter showdown on July 23 with an injured hamstring and a decidedly negative vibe.

Synonyms
acrid, bitter, embittered, hard, rancorous, resentful, sore

Antonyms
unbitter

acrocephalous having a pointed or peaked skull

acrography the art of making wood blocks in relief

acrolith wooden statue with stone extremities

acrologic of, like or pertaining to initials

acromegaly glandular disorder causing gigantism of extremities

acronical occurring at nightfall or sunset

acronym word formed from initial letters of another word

acronyx ingrown nail

acropathy disease or illness of the extremities

acrophobia fear of heights

Acrophobia – abnormal dread of being in a high place. fear of heights.

acrophonic using a symbol for the initial sound of a thing

acropodium pedestal upon which a statue rests

acroscopic looking or moving towards the apex

acroteleutic phrase or words at the end of a psalm

acroterion pedestal or ornament at the angle of a pediment

acrotism absence of pulsing

actinism action of solar radiation causing chemical change

actinograph instrument used to calculate time of photographic exposure

actinometer instrument for measuring incident radiation

actinotherapy use of ultraviolet rays as medical therapy

acton stuffed jacket worn under armour; haqueton

actuate communicate motion to; cause

Actuate – Motivate – I fail to understand what actuated you to reply to that man so nastily.

Acuity – Sharpness – In 50s his youthful acuity of vision failed him, and he needed glasses.

aculeate prickly; pointed; stinging; a stinging insect

aculeiform shaped like a thorn

acultomancy divination using needles

acumen
(n.) keen insight (Because of his mathematical acumen, Larry was able to figure out in minutes problems that took other students hours.)


acuminate tapered; pointed; to sharpen

acutiator sharpener of weapons


acutorsion twisting artery with needle to stop bleeding

acyanopsia colour-blindness with respect to blue

acyesis female sterility

acyrology incorrect diction or pronunciation

adactylous lacking fingers or claws

adamantine unbreakable; impenetrable

adamitism nakedness for religious reasons

adaxial next to or towards the axis

addax large African antelope

addax spiral-horned antelope dwelling in the Sahara desert

additament thing added or appended; heraldic ornament

addititious of, pertaining to or resulting from addition

Addle – putrid; barren; muddled

Addle Putrid Barren Muddled

addorsed turned back to back in heraldry

adduce cite as proof or instance

adeciduate evergreen; coniferous

adeem to cancel a bequest by destruction of the object

adelaster provisional name for a plant whose flowers are unknown

adelphogamy sharing of a wife by two or more brothers

ademption revocation of donation by donor

adenalgia painful swelling of a gland

adenia glandular swelling

adeniform shaped like a gland

adenography descriptive work on the glandular system

adenoid of, like or pertaining to or like a gland

adenology study of glands

adenotomy removal or excision of gland

adespota anonymous works

adessive indicating place where or proximity to

adevism denial of gods of mythology and legend

adharma unrighteousness

adhibit to attach; to admit; to administer

adhocracy government in an unstructured fashion; an unstructured organization

adiabatic without transference of heat

adiaphoresis absence of perspiration; inability to perspire

adiaphorism doctrine of theological indifference or latitudinarianism

adiaphoron tenet or belief on which a theological system is indifferent

adiapneustia defective perspiration

adiathermancy impermeability to radiant energy

adipescent becoming fat or fatty

adipic of, like or pertaining to fatty substances

adipocere fatty substance occurring in corpses left in moist areas

adipsia absence or lack of thirst

adit opening or passage into a mine

adjudge to decide; to award

adjutage nozzle

adjutant enormous Indian stork

adjutor helper; assistant

adjuvant substance added to make vaccine more effective

admanuensis one who takes an oath on a religious book

admaxillary connected to or near the jaw

admeasurement the act of measuring or apportioning

adminicle that which supports or aids, especially evidence

admonish –

To admonish is to scold. If you want to show someone you’re not happy with his behavior, admonish him. It sounds better than “scolding,” and it’s less painful than spanking.

Coming to English through Old French from the Latin admonere “to advise, remind,” admonish is always used with an eye on improving someone’s behavior. The exact meaning of this formal verb varies in intensity depending generally on who is being corrected. If a child or subordinate is being admonished, it means “scold” or “rebuke” whereas if someone admonishes a person with equal standing, warn or advise are closer synonyms.

adnascent growing on some other thing

adnominal indicating adjective used as a noun

adnomination punning

adnoun adjective serving or used as a noun

adonise to adorn oneself

adoptionism belief that Christ was the adopted and not natural son of God

adoral near the mouth

adosculation impregnation by contact alone or by wind

adown in a descending direction

adoxography good writing on a trivial subject

adoxy beliefs that are neither orthodox nor heterodox

adpress to press together

adrogation adoption of a boy or girl before adolescence

adscititious added; additional

adscript attached or feudally bound to the soil or earth

adsorb to attract and stick to the surface

adumbrate indicate faintly; foreshadow

adumbrate – (v.) to sketch out in a vague way (The coach adumbrated a game plan, but none of the players knew precisely what to do.)
To adumbrate something is to outline it. In an English essay, you could adumbrate the themes in a novel; or, in a letter to Santa, you could adumbrate all the ways you have been behaving.

Adumbrate is built on the Latin root umbra, “shade,” and the image it evokes is of a shadow being cast around something. Your outline is like a shadow of something bigger — like the themes in that novel or the ways you have been behaving. You can also use adumbrate to mean “foreshadow”: “The scene where the princess dreams of the vampire adumbrates her later discovery that her little brother is, in fact, a vampire.”

adunc hooked

aduncate shaped like a hook or crook

adust burnt; scorched

advection horizontal movement of air

advehent bringing inwards

advenient due to outside causes

adventitious accidental; casual

adventive a thing or person coming from outside

adversaria miscellaneous notes; commonplace books

adversative word or phrase expressing opposition

advert refer to in speech or writing

advertorial advertisement presented as if it were editorial material

advesperate darken; become late

advocaat liqueur containing rum and raw eggs

advowson right of presentation to church living

adynamia helplessness; lack of strength

adynaton rhetorical use of a nearly impossible situation for emphasis

adytum sacred part of a temple or church; church chancel

adzebill prehistoric flightless bird of New Zealand

aedile magistrate in charge of games, markets or buildings

Aedine – A woman disturbing like a mosquito

Aedine Woman A naughty woman who disturbs and bites like a mosquito

_

aedoeology science of generative organs

aegilops stye in inner corner of eye

Aegis protection; support – A shield or a protection; sponsorship or patronage; such as, financial support or an exchange of favors when a person will do something for others if they will do the same for the sponsor

aegis, egis (s) (noun); aegises (pl)
1. A shield or defensive armor: The aegis was a mythological shield associated with Zeus and Athena and was shown as a short cloak consisting of a goatskin.

The aegis of Athena is usually shown with a border of snakes and with the head of Medusa in the center.

The aegis is considered to be more emblematic of protection and power than a military shield.
2. The power to protect, to support, or to control someone or something: The protection of citizen’s rights is under the aegis of the law.

The local bowling team was under the aegis of an unusual man with a lot of money which guaranteed his sponsorship and support of the group.

Aegis egis shield protection
3. Etymology: from Greek aigis, and then from Latin aegis, “the shield of Zeus”, said to be made of goatskin, and therefore popularly derived from aig-, the stem of aix-, “goat”.

“Zeus, who was the supreme deity of the Greeks, was suckled, when a baby, by a goat named Amalthaea, whose skin was subsequently used to cover the great shield of Zeus.”

“Since this shield was the symbol of the power of the greatest of the gods, a person who acted ‘under the aegis’ was someone who had the power of the gods supporting him or her.”

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Aegis is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/aegis-egis-aegises-a-shield-or-a-protection/

Aelurophobia ailurophobia aelurophobias ailurophobias – An excessive or abnormal terror of being around cats

aelurophobia, ailurophobia, elurophobia (s) (nouns); aelurophobias, ailurophobias, elurophobias (pl)
An excessive or abnormal terror or panic of being around cats or any felines: There are some people who have aelurophobias and so they can’t tolerate being around any cats.

Aelurophobia excessive abnormal terror of being around cats

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Aelurophobia is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/aelurophobia-ailurophobia-aelurophobias-ailurophobias-an-excessive-or-abnormal-terror-of-being-around-cats/

aegrotat medical certificate of illness excusing student’s sickness

aeneous shining bronze colour

aeolian giving forth a tone as if produced by the wind

aeolipyle hollow ball that turns through steam escaping through valves

aeolistic long-winded

aeolotropy variation in physical properties on basis of position

aeonian lasting for an immeasurably long period of time

aepyornis gigantic flightless bird of Madagascar

aerenchyma respiratory tissue

Aerialist – Anyone who skillfully performs gymnastic feats or other activities that involve agility and balance high in the air above the ground; such as, on a trapeze

aerialist (s) (noun), aerialists (pl)

Aerialist Anyone who skillfully performs gymnastic feats
An acrobat or someone who skillfully performs gymnastic feats or other actions that involve agility and balance high in the air above the ground on a trapeze or a tightrope: The star of the circus was the youngest of a family of famed aerialists who have successfully performed together on the tightrope and trapeze for decades.

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Aerialist is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/aerialist-aerialists-anyone-who-skillfully-performs-gymnastic-feats/

Aerie – The nest of an eagle or other bird of prey that has a nest high above the ground

also Aerie means – a house or living quarters of a person, or people, which is located on a high place

aerie (ER ee, IR ee) (s) (noun), aeries (pl)

Aerie house located on a high place
1. The nest of an eagle, hawk, or other bird of prey that has a nest in a high place: The hikers could see an adult eagle taking food to its young in the aerie.
2. A house, habitation, or living quarters of a person, or people, which is located on a high place: Living on the 85th floor of the high rise condominium made Jennifer feel as if she were living in an aerie high above the city.

Aerie – a house or living quarters of a person, or people, which is located on a high place

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Aerie is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/aerie-aeries-the-nest-of-an-eagle-or-other-bird-of-prey-that-has-a-nest-high-above-the-ground/

aeriform of the form or shape of gas; gaseous

aerious of the nature of air; airy

aerobe organism requiring oxygen to survive

aerobiology study of airborne organisms

aerodonetics science or study of gliding

aerogenesis forming or generating gas or air

aerography descriptive work on the atmosphere

aerolite meteorite

aerolith stone that falls from the sky; meteorite

aerolithology study of aerolites; meteorites

aerology study of the atmosphere

aeromancy divination by means of the weather

aerometer instrument for measuring weight or density of gas

aerophane thin crinkled semi-transparent fabric

aerophilately collecting of air-mail stamps

aerophobia fear of flying or draughts

aerophone musical instrument like a concertina

aerophore instrument used to inflate stillborn child’s lungs

aeropleustic of, like or pertaining to aerial navigation

aerostat any lighter-than air craft; balloon

aerostatics science of air pressure; art of ballooning

aeruginous of, like or pertaining to copper-rust or verdigris

aerugo rust of any metal

aesc letter used in Old English for ‘ae’

Aesculapian – (adjective) (not comparable) Relating to the art of medicine, or a medical practitioner: Aesculapius was the Greco-Roman god of medicine, or the healing arts, and so an Aesculapian professional usually refers to a physician or to a medical doctor.

Aesculapian – A Greco-Roman term referring to medical doctors or physicians

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Aesculapian is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/aesculapian-a-greco-roman-term-referring-to-medical-doctors-or-physicians/

aesopian conveying meaning only to those in a secret movement

aesthesia sensibility

aesthesiogenic producing or causing a sensation

Aesthetic – Pertaining to beauty, sensitive to what is beautiful and possessing a cultivated and artistic taste

aesthetic, esthetic (adjective); more aesthetic, more esthetic; most aesthetic, most esthetic
1. A reference to the sensitivity and appreciation for art and beauty: The Egyptian statues in the museum show the esthetic concepts that the ancient artists created.

 
2. Relating to pure beauty rather than to other considerations: The esthetic gemstones alone have a special beauty which is extended in the jewelry which incorporates them.

Aesthetics – Pertaining to beauty, sensitive to what is beautiful and possessing a cultivated and artistic taste

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Aesthetic is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/aesthetic-esthetic-more-aesthetic-more-esthetic-most-aesthetic-most-esthetic/

Visual Dictionary from SKMClases for tough Vocabulary, in cartoon forms, for SAT, GRE, CAT, and other vital English exams

aestheticism doctrine that beauty is central to other moral principles

aestival of, like or pertaining to summer

aethrioscope instrument for measuring temperature variations due to sky conditions

aeviternal everlasting; endless

aeviternity eternal existence

afebrile not suffering from fever

affabulation moral of a fable

affeer to assess; to reduce to a fixed sum

afferent bearing, bringing or carrying towards

Affiliate – Someone who is associated with a high ranking person as a subordinate worker

Affiliate Someone who is associated with high-ranking person as subordinate worker

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Affiliate is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/affiliate-affiliates-someone-who-is-associated-with-a-high-ranking-person-as-a-subordinate-worker/

Affiance to trust; to betroth

Affine a relation by marriage

Afflated inspired

Afflatus inspiration; divine impetus

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Afflatus is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/afflatus-afflatuses-a-creative-inspiration-or-impulse-as-a-result-of-a-divine-inspiration/

Afforce to strengthen a jury by adding skilled people

Afforest to cover with forest; to convert into hunting grounds

Affranchise to free from slavery or similar obligation

Affray – an attack or assault; an alarm or fright

Affray an attack or assault; an alarm or fright


Affrayer disturber of the peace

Affreightment hiring of a vessel

Affreux frightening

Affricate consonant that begins as a plosive and ends as a fricative

Affront – A deliberately offensive act or something producing the effect of deliberate disrespect

Affront (verb), affronts; affronted; affronting Treat, mention, or speak to rudely

affront deliberately offensive act something producing effect of deliberate disrespect
1. To intentionally insult someone; especially, openly in order to cause displeasure, anger, and resentment: Don’t affront the speaker by asking him such rude questions.

2. To do or to say something which shows a lack of respect or consideration for another person’s feelings: The customer was affronted by the salesperson’s rude behavior.

3. Making an obvious and intentional offense, slight, or insult: The supervisor affronted his employee by saying, “Your proposals have no practical value; so, don’t make such suggestions again”.

Someone can insult another person in private; however, when anyone is affronted, it is done in public.

3. Etymology: fron Latin ad-, “to” + frons, “forehead”; originally “to confront a person face to face”.

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Affront is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/affront-a-deliberately-offensive-act-or-something-producing-the-effect-of-deliberate-disrespect/

affronté of two heraldic animals, facing one another

affusion pouring on; as of baptismal water


afore before

afterclap unexpected damaging or unsettling after-effect

afterdeck deck behind a ship’s bridge

aftergame rematch; means employed after first turn of affairs

afterguard men who work the aft sails on the quarterdeck and poop deck

afterhand subsequently

afterings last milk drawn when milking a cow

afterpiece minor piece after a play

aftershaft second shaft coming out of the quill of a feather

afterwil locking of the barn after the cows have been let out

agacerie allurement; coquetry

agalactia failure or inability to produce milk

agalloch eaglewood

Agamist – one who opposes marriage

Agamist one who opposes marriage

agamogenesis reproduction by non-sexual means

agape selfless Christian love; a feast in celebration of such love

agapeistic characterized by Christian love

Agapet – Lover of women

Agapet Lover of women

agapetae churchwomen who live platonically with celibate men

agapism ethics of love

agastopia admiration of part of another’s body

agatewear type of ceramic resembling agate stone

agathism belief in ultimate triumph of good despite evil means

agathodaimon one’s good genius; the good part of one’s conscience

agelast one who never laughs

agennesic sterile; impotent

agenocratia opposition to birth control

agentive indicating agent performing an action

ageotropic moving or turning away from the earth

Agersia – Quality of not growing old

Agersia Quality of not growing old

ageusia damage to the sense of taste

agger artificial mound or elevation for military use

aggerose in heaps; piled up

aggiornamento modernization of ideas of the Catholic church

aggrade to raise level of a surface through depositing detritus

aggrandize increase power or rank of; make greater


aggrandize –

If you are a window washer, but you refer to yourself as a “vista enhancement specialist,” then you are aggrandizing your job title — that is, making it sound greater than it is.

The verb aggrandize not only means “to make appear greater”; it can also be used to mean simply “to make greater.” If you buy an estate and sink millions of dollars into its improvement, then you are actually aggrandizing the estate. If you are making yourself seem greater, then people may say you are “self -aggrandizing.”

aggrate to gratify or please

aggry type of West African glass beads

agio premium paid on foreign currency exchange

agiotage playing the stock market; speculation

agist to charge with a public burden; to take in to graze for payment

agistment land tax assessed for cattle pasturing

aglet metal point attached to a lace or string

agma symbol or sound for a velar nasal consonant “ng”

agminate grouped

agnail sore, corn or hangnail on the toe or foot

agname name over and above the ordinary name and surname

agnation kinship

agnize to acknowledge or confess

agnomen additional name; surname; nickname

agnomination rhetorical use of similar-sounding words for effect

agnosic unable to recognize familiar objects due to brain damage

agnosticism doctrine that we can know nothing beyond material phenomena

agnosy ignorance

agoge tempo or sequence in melody in ancient Greek music

agogic accenting a musical note by slightly dwelling on it

agomphosis looseness in the teeth

agone ago

agonic making no angle

agonism competition; effort; striving

agonistes someone in the grip of inner conflict

agonistic of, like or pertaining to or being aggressive or argumentative

agonistics art and theory of prize-fighting

agoraphobia fear of open spaces

agouti tropical rabbit-sized rodent

agowilt sudden sickening and unnecessary fear

agraffe hooked clasp used by masons to hold blocks together

agrapha sayings of Jesus not found in the canonical gospels

Agraphia – inability to write

Agraphia inability to write

agravic having no gravity; pertaining to the condition of zero-gravity

agrestic of the fields; rural; unpolished

agriology the comparative study of primitive peoples

agrize to horrify; to disfigure

agrizoiatry medicine specializing in wild animals

agrobiology study of plant nutrition; soil yields

agrology study of agricultural soils

agromania intense desire to be in open spaces

agronomics study of productivity of land

agrostography writing about grasses

agrostology science or study of grasses

agrypnia insomnia

agrypnotic anything taken to aid wakefulness

aguardiente Spanish or Portuguese brandy

agyiophobia fear of crossing busy streets

agynary lacking female genitals

ahimsa the duty of sparing animal life; non-violence

ahull with sails furled and helm lashed to the lee-side

ai three-toed sloth

aichmophobia fear of sharp or pointed objects

aiger tidal wave occurring in rivers

aigrette a spray of jewels; ornamental feather plume; an egret

aiguille sharp; needle-like peak of rock

aileron flap on airplane wing for lateral balance

ailette plate of armour worn on shoulder

ailuromancy divination by watching cats’ movements

ailurophilia love of cats

ailurophobia fear of cats

aioli garlic-flavoured mayonnaise

airscrew aircraft propeller

aischrolatry worship of filth, dirt, or smut

aisling a vision or dream

ait small island in lake or river

aitchbone rump bone of cattle; rump cut of beef

aiué elderly; senior

akeratophorous not horned

akinesia loss of ability to move

ala membranous outgrowth on a plant or animal

alabamine alternate name for the element astatine

alacrity
(n.) eagerness, speed (For some reason, Chuck loved to help his mother whenever he could, so when his mother asked him to set the table, he did so with alacrity.)

Someone with alacrity shows cheerful willingness and eager behavior, like a kid whose mother has told him he can buy anything in a candy store.

While the noun alacrity normally refers to someone’s peppy behavior, it can also describe a certain mood or tempo of a musical composition, indicating how the music should be played. Alacrity comes from the Latin alacritas, and the Italian musical term allegro is a near relation.

_

alack expression of sorrow or regret

alalia loss of ability to speak

alameda public walkway between rows of poplar trees

alamode lightweight glossy silk

alamort half-dead; dejected

alannah term of endearment used with one’s child

alar of, like or pertaining to the wing or shoulder

alastrim mild form of smallpox

alate lately

alation state of having wings; position of wings on a creature

alaudine of, like or pertaining to skylarks

alb long white robe worn by priests

albarello cylindrical jar used to hold drugs

albata variety of German silver

albe although; albeit

albedo whiteness, as of a celestial object

albescent becoming white; whiteness

albicant whitish; becoming white

albificative able to whiten or be whitened

albion medieval astronomical device for finding positions of planets

albocracy government by white people

albolith white cement formed from magnesia and silica

albugineous like the white of an eye or an egg; white-coloured

alcahest alchemical universal solvent

alcatote silly elf

alcine of, like or pertaining to elks; of, like or pertaining to auks

alcoholometer instrument for measuring proportion of alcohol in solutions

alcovinometer instrument to measure strength of wine

aleatoric depending on contingencies or chance


aleberry beverage made from ale, spices, and dried bread

alecost costmary, an herb used in flavouring ale

alectormancy divination by sacrificing a rooster

alectryomachy cock-fighting

alectryomancy divination by watching a rooster gather corn kernels

alee on or toward the lee

alegar vinegar made by turning ale sour

alembicated over-refined

alepine mixed wool and silk or mohair and cotton fabric

alethiology study of truth

aleuromancy divination using flour or meal

alexia inability to read

alexipharmic antidote

alfet cauldron of boiling water used during trials by ordeal

alforge wallet or leather bag

algedonics science of pleasure and pain

algefacient cooling

algetic causing or producing pain

algicide killer of algae

algid cold; chilly

alginuresis painful urination

algolagnia sexual pleasure derived from inflicting pain

algology study of algae

algophobia fear of pain

algor coldness; shivering fit

algraphy art of printing from aluminum plates

alible nourishing

alicorn mythical wavy-horned bull, often used as heraldic device

alidade revolving index on astrolabe or other instrument for reading gradations

alieniloquy speech on subjects other than the matter at hand; off-topic speech

aliform wing-shaped

aligerous winged

aliicide killing of someone other than oneself; murder

aliped having wings on the feet

aliphatic of, like or pertaining to fat or fats in general

aliquant number dividing into another with a remainder

aliquot number dividing into another without leaving a remainder

aliter requiring a different law to be applied; it is otherwise; in other words

aliunde from elsewhere

alk sap or resin from turpentine trees

alkalimeter instrument for measuring strength of alkalines

alkanet reddish plant-based dye

allantiasis food poisoning resulting from inadequate preservation

allantoid shaped like a sausage

allative indicating movement towards

allemain enormous pudding out of which acrobats leap

allemande courtly baroque dance in which the arms are interlaced

alliaceous of, like or pertaining to garlic; garlicky

allicient attracting something else

allision intentional collision of two ships

allocatur amount allowed for costs

allochthonous formed or produced elsewhere or externally

allodic not subject to a superior

allogamy cross-fertilization

allogeneous different

allography writing another individual’s signature

allolalia speech disorder featuring randomly spoken words

allonge paper attached to commercial bill requiring signatures

allonym other person’s name used by an author

alloquy speaking to another or many others; an address

allotheism belief in or worship of strange gods

Allotriophagy craving for strange foods

Allotropy of an element, having more than one form

Allude alludes alluded; alluding – To make a reference to something to hint at indirectly without any specific identification or details

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Allude is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/allude-alludes-alluded-alluding-to-make-a-reference-to-something-to-hint-at-indirectly-without-any-specific-identification-or-details/

Alluring – Fascinating and charming highly attractive

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Alluring is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/alluring-more-alluring-most-alluring-fascinating-and-charming-highly-attractive/

Allusion allusions – An indirect reference, a comparison, or a brief hint

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Allusion is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/allusion-allusions-an-indirect-reference-a-comparison-or-a-brief-hint/

Alluvion effect of water impacting on shoreline

allwhere elsewhere; everywhere

almacantar circle of altitude, parallel to the horizon

almagest textbook or handbook, especially dealing with astronomy

almandine violet-coloured garnet

almoner giver of alms; social worker in a hospital

almuce cloth or fur hood

alnager inspector of cloth

soup food inspector

Alogism – illogical statement

Alogism illogical statement

_
Alomancy divination using salt
Alopecia baldness; hair loss

Alopecoid of or resembling a fox
alow below
alpaca fine wool made from alpaca hair


alpenglow reddish glow appearing at sunrise or sunset in mountains


alpenstocker mountain climber

alpestrine of, like or pertaining to alpine regions


alphenic sugary candy used in medicine

alphitomancy divination using loaves of barley


alphonsin instrument used to extract bullets from bodies


alt high musical tone

altarage payment to priest for mass; offerings at altar


alterity state of being different


alternatim alternately


altiloquence pompous or high speech

altisonant high-sounding

altitonant thundering on high or loudly

altricial having young requiring care for a lengthy period

aludel pear-shaped pot used in sublimation

aluminiferous bearing aluminum

alveary beehive; area of the ear where wax collects; word-list

alveolate of or like a honeycomb

alveromancy divination using sounds

alviducous purgative

alvine of the belly

ama a Japanese pearl-diver

amadelphous outgoing; gregarious

amain to a high degree; exceedingly; at full speed

amanous lacking hands

amanuensis one employed to write from dictation

amaranth imaginary flower reputed never to fade

amaranthine immortal; undying; deep purple-red colour

amasesis inability to chew

amasthenic focusing light rays to a single point

amathophobia fear of dust

amaxophobia fear of riding in a car

ambages windings; roundabout ways; delays

ambeer juice from chewing tobacco

amberjack spiny-finned Atlantic sport fish

ambiloquous using dubious or ambiguous expressions

ambivalent – If you can’t decide how you feel about something, declare yourself ambivalent about it. Ambivalent means “having mixed feelings about something.” A Swiss psychologist named Eugen Bleuler coined the German word Ambivalenz in the early twentieth century, and it was soon imported into English. Bleuler combined the Latin prefix ambi-, meaning “both,” with valentia, “strength.” So etymologically speaking, if you’re ambivalent you’re being pulled by two equally strong things — but in practice, ambivalence often arises from caring very little either way. You might feel ambivalent about your lunch options if you have to choose between a murky stew and flavorless tofu.

ambisinistrous awkward in the use of both hands

ambit circuit; scope; compass; confines

ambo early Christian raised reading desk or pulpit

ambry recess for church vessels; cupboard or niche

ambsace bad luck; a low score

ambulatory aisle down the east end of a church

ambulomancy divination by taking a walk

ambulophobia fear of walking

ambustion burn or scald

Amenable –

If your friends want to try sky diving and you’re amenable to the idea, sounds like you’re going to be jumping out of a plane. If a person or thing is amenable to something, they are ready, willing, or responsive.

Note that amenable is often followed by the preposition to, which makes amenable mean “able to be controlled or affected by something,” as in “They are usually amenable to our wishes;” or “Her heart condition is not amenable to treatment.” An amenable personality is open to influence or control and is willing to agree or yield.

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amende fine or reparation paid

ament a person who fails to develop mentally

amerce to fine; to deprive; to punish

ametropia abnormal optical refraction

amice strip of fine linen worn as cloak or wrap by priest at mass

amicicide murder of a friend

amidmost in the very middle

amidships midway between the bow and stern of a ship

ammeter instrument for measuring electrical current

ammophilous sand-loving; preferring to dwell in sand

amnicolist one who lives near a river

amniomancy divination by examining afterbirth

amorce percussion cap for a toy pistol

amoret love sonnet or song

amoretto a cherub or spirit of love

ampelidious of, like or pertaining to vines

ampelography scientific description of the vine

ampere unit for measuring amount of electrical current

amphibiolith fossilized amphibian

amphibolic able to turn both backwards and forwards; double-jointed

amphibology ambiguity in language; dual grammatical meaning

amphigean occurring in both hemispheres of the brain or body

amphigory a nonsense verse

amphimixis interbreeding; intermixing of two individuals’ genetic matter

amphipneust animal with both lungs and gills

amphisbaena mythical two-headed serpent or lizard

amphiscian of, like or pertaining to torrid regions

amphiuma aquatic American salamander with two pairs of small feet

amphoriloquy cavernous voice of a patient heard over a patient’s lung cavity

amplect to embrace

amplexus rutting of frogs and toads

Ampliative – supplemental; additional

Ampliative supplemental additional

amplivagant stretching far; having a great scope

ampulla vessel for holy oil or wine for coronations or rituals

amrita Hindu ambrosia bestowing immortality

amygdaloid almond-shaped; of, like or pertaining to tonsils

amyloid containing or pertaining to starch; starchy

amyous lacking muscle

ana in equal quantities

anabasis journey leading upwards; first phase of an illness

anabiosis return to life after apparent death

anacampserote something which can bring back a lost love

anacamptic reflecting or reflected light; sound or water

anacardic of, like or pertaining to cashews

anacathartic causing vomiting or expectoration

anachoric foreign or geographically absurd relating to a country

Anachronistic – Something that’s old-fashioned and maybe a little out of place is anachronistic, like a clunky black rotary-dial telephone sitting on a desk beside a sleek new smart-phone (or whatever the new technology when you read this).

The adjective anachronistic comes from the Greek words ana, or “against”, and khronos, or “time.” It usually refers to something old-fashioned or antique, but it can also mean anything that blatantly clashes with the time in which it is seen. Imagine watching a movie that takes place in the 1700s and seeing one of the characters pull out a cell phone. Any phone, in the context of the movie’s time period, would be anachronistic.

Anachronistic old fashioned out of the place

anaclastic refractive; of, like or pertaining to refraction

anaclitic dependent on other phenomenon or ability

anacoenosis rhetorical questioning of hearers or opponents for opinions on a matter

anacoluthon moving to new topic of discussion before finishing current one

Anacrisis – interrogation accompanied by torture

Anacrisis interrogation accompanied by torture

anacrusis syllable prior to the normal rhythm of a verse

anacusic completely deaf

anadem wreath, fillet or band

anadiplosis repeating last word of clause at beginning of next clause

anadromous fish which ascend rivers to spawn

anaerectic destructive

anaesthesiology study of anaesthetics

anagalactic coming from or existing beyond our own galaxy

anaglyph ornament in low relief

anaglyptics art of carving in bas-relief

anaglyptography art of engraving so as to give the subject an embossed appearance

anagnorisis recognition leading to denouement of a play

anagogy mystical interpretation

anagraphy art of constructing catalogues

analects crumbs that fall from the table

analemma sundial

analepsis repetition of a word or phrase for emphasis; pleonasm

analgia inability to feel pain

anamnesis reminiscence; prayer recalling death and resurrection of Jesus

anamorphic changing to a more complex form

anandrious impotent

ananym name written backward; often used as synonym

anapeiratic caused by excessive use

anapest two short metrical syllables followed by one long one

anaphalantiasis falling out of the eyebrows

anaphia loss of sense of touch

anaphora repetition of a word at beginning of successive phrases for emphasis

anapnea recovery of one’s breath; restoration of breath

anastasic convalescent

anastrophe reversing or inverting word order as rhetorical device


anathema – (n.) a cursed, detested person ( I never want to see that murderer. He is an anathema to me.)

Something that one absolutely and positively cannot stand is anathema. Garlic is anathema to vampires (ditto for stakes and daylight). So is kryptonite to Superman or a silver bullet to a werewolf.

Originally the term anathema comes from the Catholic practice of denouncing a particular individual or idea that was antithetical to the Catholic Church.

If done to a person, it excommunicated them, meaning they could no longer partake in the church’s sacraments (with presumably pretty poor consequences for the soul.) That’s a lot worse than kryptonite.

Anathema cursed detested woman

anatine of, like or pertaining to ducks

anatocism compound interest

anatreptic overcoming; overturning

Anaudia – loss of voice

Anaudia loss of voice

anaunter on the chance; lest

anbury soft fleshy tumour in horses

anchorite one withdrawn from the world for religious reasons

ancillary auxiliary; secondary

ancipitous two-edged and flattened

ancistroid hook-shaped

ancon elbow

anconoid of, like or pertaining to the elbow

ancoral of, shaped like or resembling an anchor

ancress female religious recluse

andiron iron bar used to support the end of a log in a fire

andragogy science of teaching adults

androcracy government by men

androlepsia governmental kidnapping for political purposes

kidnapped in a car 2

andromania nymphomania

androphagy cannibalism

Aneabil – single; unmarried

Aneabil singlr unmarried

anear nearly; almost

anele to administer extreme unction to

anemocracy government by the wind or by whim

anemograph instrument for measuring pressure and velocity of wind

anemography treatise on the winds

anemology study of winds

anemometer instrument for measuring wind velocity

anemophilous pollinated by wind

anencephalic lacking a brain

anent about; concerning

anergia failure of immune system; loss of energy

anesis tuning to a lower musical pitch

aneuria lack of nervous energy

anfractuous full of windings and intricate turnings

angary the right of a belligerent to seize neutral property

angelocracy government by angels

angelolatry worship of or belief in angels

angelology study of angels

angelot musical instrument resembling a lute

angelus prayer said in morning, at noon and at sunset

angiogenesis production of blood vessels

angiography description or examination of the blood vessels

angiology study of blood flow and lymphatic system

anglice in plain English

anglomania craze or obsession with England and the English

anglophilia love or fondness for England or the English

anglophobia fear of England or the English

angora silk-like fabric made from wool of angora goats

angstrom unit of one ten-billionth of a meter

anguiform shaped like a snake

anguilliform shaped like an eel

anguine of, like or pertaining to snakes

anhedonia an unresponsiveness to pleasure

anhelation shortness of breath

anhidrosis absence of perspiration

anhinga long-necked fish-eating tropical American bird

aniconic symbolizing without aiming at resemblance

anicular like an old woman

anile imbecilic; senile; like a very old woman

animadvert to comment critically on; to censure

animalism belief that humans are mere animals

animastic spiritual; animate

animé of a heraldic animal, having eyes differently-coloured from the animal itself

animism attribution of soul to inanimate objects

anion positively charged ion

anisothenic being of unequal strength

anker liquid measure of 8 1/2 gallons

ankus spiked elephant goad

ankyloglossia condition where motion of tongue is impeded; state of being tongue-tied

ankyroid hook-shaped

anlace short two-edged dagger

anneal to heat and cool metal gradually to temper

annectent having intermediate features between two taxa

annihilationism doctrine that the wicked are utterly destroyed after death

annodated shaped like the letter S

annomination pun; play on words

annuent nodding or moving of the head

annulated furnished with rings, wearing rings

annulet small ring around a classical column

annulose ringed; composed of rings

anoa small wild ox of Indonesia

anocathartic emetic; causing vomiting or expectoration

anodontia toothlessness

anodyne something that relieves pain or suffering

anoesis sensation not accompanied by understanding of it

anogenic formed from below or beneath

Anole – arboreal American lizard with ability to change colour

anomia inability to remember names

anomic in a state lacking social order and norms

anomie condition of lacking accepted social values or standards

anomphalous without a navel

anon at once; immediately

anonym person whose name is not given; pseudonym

anonymuncule minor anonymous writer

anopheline of, like or pertaining to malarial mosquitoes

anopisthographic bearing writing or inscription only on one side

anopsia blindness

anorchous lacking testicles

anosmia lack or loss of sense of smell

anotic lacking ears

ansate having a handle or hand-like shape

anserated of a heraldic cross, having the extremities cleft

anserine of, like or pertaining to geese

anta pier produced by thickening wall at one end

antalgic alleviating or relieving pain

antanaclasis repetition of key word of phrase as a play on words

antapology response to an apology

antarchy opposition to government; anarchy

anteambulo usher

antechapel anteroom to a chapel or church

antechinus carnivorous mouselike Australian marsupial

Antediluvian – Antediluvian means “before the flood” — that is, the Biblical flood with Noah’s ark. Generally, though, the word is used — often humorously — to describe something really, really old.

In popular language, antediluvian is almost always used to exaggerate how comically, ridiculously old and out-of-date something is. You may laugh at your parents’ antediluvian ideas of what’s proper for going out on a date. And how about those antediluvian computers they still insist are fine! When the word was coined in the seventeenth century, however, it was meant literally. Back then, the science of reconstructing the Earth’s history used the Bible as a frame of reference.
_

antejentacular before breakfast

anteloquy a preface

antelucan before dawn or daylight

antemundane before one’s own birth; before the creation of the world

antenniferous bearing antennae

antepast foretaste

antependium covering or cloth over pulpit or altar

antephialtic preventing nightmares

antepone to put before; to prefer

anteprandial before dinner

antevenient preceding

anthelion luminous ring seen on a cloud opposite the sun

anthelminthic destroying or expelling worms

anthesis full bloom

anthography scientific description of flowers

anthomancy divination using flowers

anthomania obsession with flowers

anthophilous loving or frequenting flowers

anthorism counter-definition; redefinition of opponent’s term for rhetorical effect

anthracomancy divination using burning coals

anthrophobia fear of humans

anthropobiology study of human biology

anthropocentrism belief that humans are central to the universe

anthropogenesis origin of human beings

anthropoglot animal with human tongue; animal capable of speech

anthropolatry worship of human beings

anthropolith fossilized human skeleton

anthropomancy divination using human entrails

anthropomorphization attribution of human qualities to animals

anthropopathy ascription of human feelings to inanimate object

anthropophaginian cannibal

anthropophagous eating humans

anthroposophy knowledge of the nature of humanity; human wisdom

anthropotheism belief that gods are only deified men

anthypophora refuting an objection using a contrary inference

antibasilican opposed to monarchic principle

antiblastic providing natural immunity against harmful substances

antibromic eliminating offensive odours

antichresis enjoyment of mortgaged property in lieu of interest payments

antichthon hypothetical second Earth on the opposite side of the sun

anticlimax expression whose last part is decreased in effect from the prior part

anticryptic camouflaged; having protective resemblance to environment

antidisestablishmentarianism doctrine opposed to removing Church of England’s official religion status

antigalactic preventing the secretion of milk

antigropelos waterproof leggings

antilapsarianism denial of doctrine of the fall of humanity

antilegomena books of the New Testament not part of early Christian Bible

antilogarithm number of which a given number is the logarithm

antilogism statement of three propositions containing

antilogy contradiction

antiloquy speaking against some idea; contradicting or gainsaying

antimacassar protective covering for back of sofa or chair

antimetabole figure in which words or phrases are repeated but in inverse order

antimetathesis inversion of the parts of an antithesis

antimnemonic damaging the memory; eliminating memories

antimony brittle, bluish-white metallic element

antinomianism doctrine of the rejection of moral law

antinomy contradiction between two logical conclusions

antipathy
(n.) a strong dislike, repugnance (I know you love me, but because you are a liar and a thief, I feel nothing but antipathy for you.)

_

antipedobaptism denial of validity of infant baptism

antiperistasis opposition or resistance

antiphon anthem sung as a response during church service

antiphrasis use of words in a sense opposite to literal

antipudic concealing private parts of the body

antiscian dweller on the exact opposite side of the world

antistrophe repetition of words in reverse order

antistrophon turning of opponent’s own argument against them

antithalian opposed to mirth or fun

antithesis contrast of ideas by means of parallel arrangement of words or clauses

antitypy resistance to being penetrated

antonomasia use of descriptive phrase or epithet instead of proper name

antre cave

antrorse turned upward and forward

anuptaphobia fear of staying single

anuresis inability to urinate

anurous tailless

anzactile army biscuit

aorist expressing simple past time with no continuance

apaesthesia numbness or loss of sensation in a limb

apagoge proof by showing the falsehood of the opposite

apanage privilege of office; especially one given to younger offspring

apantomancy divination using objects at hand

aparithmesis rhetorical answer to a proposition

apatetic of an animal’s coloration or markings

apay to satisfy

apercu brief outline; glimpse; intuitive insight

aperient laxative

aphagia inability to eat or swallow

aphemia loss of ability to produce articulate speech

apheresis taking away a sound or syllable at the beginning of a word

aphesis loss of initial unaccented vowel from beginning of a word

aphicide killer of aphids

aphidicide killer of aphids

aphnology science of wealth

aphologistic flameless

aphotic lightless

aphrasia inability to speak

aphrodisiomania abnormal sexual interest

aphthong silent letter

apian of, like or pertaining to bees

apiarian of, like or pertaining to bees or beekeeping

apical of or at the apex

apiculate ending in a small apex or point

apiculture beekeeping

apiology study of bees

Apistia – faithlessness in marriage

Apistia faithlessness in marriage

apivorous eating bees

aplanatic a lens free of spherical aberration

apocalypticism doctrine of the imminent end of the world

apocarteresis suicide by starvation

apocatastasis final restitution of all things at the appearance of the Messiah

apocatastisis reversion or restoration to original position

apocope cutting off the last sound of a word

apocrisiary papal secretary

apocryphal –

Urban legends — stories about phantom hitchhikers, deep-fried rats, and spider eggs in bubblegum — are classic examples of apocryphal tales. They’re told

as if they’re true, but no one can ever identify their origins.

Today, any dubious or unverifiable story may be dismissed as apocryphal. If it can’t be verified, it is seen as not real, true or authentic. Originally,

however, apocryphal was reserved for religious writings that were not included in the Torah or the New Testament of the Bible because the divinity of the

texts was not certain. These texts are knows as the Apocrypha and are included in the Septuagint (a Greek version of the Hebrew Bible) and the Vulgate (a

Latin Bible edited in the 4th century).
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apodal lacking feet

apodictic necessarily true beyond contradiction

apodosis main concluding clause in a conditional sentence

Apodysophilia – feverish desire to undress

Apodysophilia feverish desire to undress

Apograph exact copy; facsimile

Apolaustic dedicated to the search for enjoyment

Apologetics defense and proof of Christianity or other doctrine

Aponia painlessness

apopemptic valedictory

apophasis saying something by stating that you will not mention it

apophoret a gift given to celebrate a new year

apophthegm brief saying; proverb; epigram

aporia professed but false doubt of what to say or choose, for rhetorical effect

aposiopesis suddenly stopping in the middle of a speech for emphasis

apositia dislike of or distaste for food

apostasy renunciation of former beliefs

apostil marginal note

apostrophe addressing of a personified thing rhetorically

apotelesm casting of a horoscope

apothegm a short, instructive saying or formula

apotheosis elevation to divine status; a perfect example

Apotropaic designed to turn away evil

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Apotropaic is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/apotropaic-more-apotropaic-most-apotropaic-descriptive-of-a-process-that-is-meant-to-avert-or-to-ward-off-bad-luck-or-evil-influences/

apparitor officer in court who attends to execute orders; harbinger

appaumé having the palm displayed

Appall – appalling – Causing shock being frightful or horrifying

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Appalling is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/appalling-more-appalling-most-appalling-causing-shock-being-frightful-or-horrifying/

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Appall is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/appall-appalls-appalled-appalling-to-horrify-to-overcome-to-frighten-to-shock-or-to-discourage/

appendant attached to; hanging from; adjunct

apperception mind’s perception of itself as a conscious agent

appersonation irrational belief that one is another person

Appetence strong craving or powerful desire. Appetency appetencies – A strong and fixed desire or compulsion an instinctive tendency

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Appetency is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/appetency-appetencies-a-strong-and-fixed-desire-or-compulsion-an-instinctive-tendency/

applanate flat; flattened; compressed

appointé in heraldry, having two things touching at the ends

apport to transport objects without material agency

appose to place in juxtaposition or proximity

apposite appropriate

approbation approval; consent

approbation
(n.) praise (The crowd welcomed the heroes with approbation.)
Approbation is an official, important-sounding, and somewhat old-fashioned word for approval or praise. A princess, for example, might only consider

marrying a prince that is met with her father’s, the King’s, approbation.

How is it possible that approbation means approval when probation is a form of being in trouble in school? Remember that probation is a testing period, to

see if you can be good. Approbation means it’s all good. Or you can remember this rhyme: “Filled with approbation, the audience gave a standing ovation.”

Apprompt – to borrow

Apprompt to borrow

appropinquity nearness

appui to support militarily

appulse a striking against something

appurtenance a subordinate or adjunct part of

apricate to bask in the sun

apricide killing of a boar

aprique sunny

Apropos more apropos most apropos – Appropriately or properly to the point or directly fitting the situation

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Apropos is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/apropos-more-apropos-most-apropos-appropriately-or-properly-to-the-point-or-directly-fitting-the-situation/

Apse rounded extension of church or other building

Apselophesia loss of sense of touch

apsidal shaped like an apse

apterygial wingless; finless

aptotic uninflected; indeclinable

aptronym name that suits its owner

apyrexy period of intermission in a fever

aquamanile ewer in the form of a human or animal figure for ceremonial handwashing

aquaphobia fear of water

aquarelle watercolour painting

aquifer a rock formation containing water

aquiform watery; liquid

aquilated in heraldry, adorned with eagle’s heads

Aquiline – of, like or pertaining to eagles; hooked like an eagle’s beak

Aquiline woman naughty woman acting like a eagle

araba wheeled Middle Eastern carriage

arachibutyrophobia fear of peanut butter sticking to roof of mouth

arachnivorous feeding on spiders

arachnology study of spiders

arachnophobia fear of spiders

araneidan of, like or pertaining to spiders

araneiform shaped like a spider

araneous transparent; delicate; like a spider’s web

araphorostic seamless

aration ploughing

arbalest type of crossbow

arborescent branched; branching; tree-shaped

Arboreal more arboreal most arboreal – Relating to, resembling, or involving trees; a reference to inhabiting or living in trees; such as, birds, animals, etc

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Arboreal is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/arboreal-more-arboreal-most-arboreal-relating-to-resembling-or-involving-trees/

Arboricide killing of trees

arboricolous growing on or living in trees

arboriform shaped like a tree

arbrolatry worship of start

arbuscle dwarf or shrub-like tree

arbustum orchard; copse of trees

Arcana (singular arcanum) are pieces of mysterious knowledge or information.

arcane – Something arcane is understood or known by only a few people. Almost everyone knows the basics of baseball, but only an elite few possess the arcane knowledge of its history that marks the true fan.

A near synonym is esoteric, as in remote information or knowledge. Experts in academic fields often show off the depth of their knowledge by mentioning some arcane and esoteric fact as if it was common for everyone to know. The origin of arcane is Latin arcanus “secret, closed,” from arca “a chest, box.” Arcana (singular arcanum) are pieces of mysterious knowledge or information.

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Arcane is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/arcane-more-arcane-most-arcane-understood-only-by-a-few-people-requiring-secret-or-mysterious-knowledge/

arcanna red chalk used to mark trees


arcate bow-shaped

arceate to prevent; to ward off

archaeolatry worship of archaic things or old customs

Archaic – Belonging to a much earlier time old and not used anymore

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Archaic is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/archaic-more-archaic-most-archaic-belonging-to-a-much-earlier-time-old-and-not-used-anymore/

archelogy the study of first principles

archet violin box


archetypal –

An archetypal thing represents an original type after which other, similar things are patterned. With her green skin, black garb, and evil ways, the Wicked

Witch of the West is an archetypal villain.

The main characters in Romeo and Juliet are the archetypal “star-crossed lovers” — we often think of them first, and use them as examples. Similarly,

Superman, with his chiseled looks, herculean strength, and good conscience, is an archetypal superhero. (Contrast him with Wolverine, whose retracting

claws, violent outbursts, and brooding make him an archetypal “anti-hero.”)

archididascalian of, like or pertaining to headmasters

archididascalos school principal

archiloquy first part of a speech

archimandrite head of a monastery or convent

archimime chief buffoon or mimic

architectonics of, like or pertaining to the arrangement of knowledge

architecuralization adaptation of non-architectural entities for architectural purposes

architrave parts surrounding a door or window, especially the top

archology science of the origins of government

arciform shaped like a bow

arctician one skilled in navigating arctic regions

arctogaeal of the arctic regions of the earth

arctoid bear-like

arctophile collector of teddy bears

arctophily study of teddy bears

arcuate arched; bow-shaped

ard plough used to scratch top surface of soil

ardass fine silk

arefy to dry up; to wither

arenaceous like, growing in or consisting of sand

arenoid sandy; like sand

areology study of Mars

areometer instrument used for measuring specific gravity

areopagitic of, like or pertaining to tribunals or courts

aret to assign or allot

aretaics the science of virtue

arete sharp mountain ridge

argali large-horned Asian wild sheep

argand gas or oil lamp

argent the heraldic colour silver or white

argentiferous bearing silver

argentocracy government by money

argil clay used in making pottery

argillaceous clayey; of or resembling clay

argol crust formed on wine kept too long or improperly

argol dried cow dung used as fuel

argosy a large merchant ship; a rich supply

arguendo for the sake of argument

arguria silver poisoning

argute shrill; keen; shrewd

argyll silver gravy dish

arietine of, like or pertaining to rams

arietinous shaped like a ram’s head

aright right; correctly

ariolation divination in general

aristarch a severe critic

aristarchy government by the best

aristology the science or art of dining

arithmancy divination using numbers

arithmocracy government by simple majority

arithmogram number composed of numerical values of letters in a word

arithmography writing a number using letters; gematria

arithmomania obsessive preoccupation with numbers

armamentarium collective equipment available to a doctor

armet round iron helmet

armigerous entitled to bear arms

armillary like or composed of rings

armipotent having strong weapons; militarily potent

armisonant resounding with noises of battle or weapons

armlet piece of armour for the arm

armomancy divination by examining one’s shoulders

armure twilled woollen or silk fabric

aroint begone

arpeggione stringed instrument like the cello

arpent unit of land area slightly smaller than an acre

arpenteur land surveyor

arrant downright; unmitigated

arras tapestry covering a wall

arrasene embroidery fabric of wool and silk

arrect attentive; erect; raised up

arrendator one who rents or farms at a yearly rent

Arreptitious – ecstatic; frantic; hasty or hurried

Arreptitious ecstatic; frantic hasty or hurried

arrestant substance causing an insect to stop moving

arrhizal lacking roots

arris sharp edge on stone; meeting of two surfaces

arrogate to claim unduly as one’s own; to ascribe
arrogate
(v.) to take without justification (The king arrogated the right to order executions to himself exclusively.)

To arrogate is to take over. When the teacher steps out of the classroom and some bossy girl marches up to the front chalkboard? What she’s trying to do is

arrogate the teacher’s authority to herself.

When someone takes control of something, often without permission, such as when a military general assumes the power of a country’s government after

getting rid of the previous leader, they arrogate power or control to themselves. Occasionally the verb arrogate means something like “assert one’s right

to,” or take something that is deserved, but more often it implies a taking by force


arrondi of a heraldic device, having rounded sides

arrosive gnawing; chewing; corroding

Arrosive gnawing chewing corroding

arthrology study of joints

arthroscope instrument for examining interior of a joint

arundiferous bearing or producing reeds

arundinaceous like or having the properties of a reed

arval of, like or pertaining to ploughed land

ascesis the practice of disciplining oneself; asceticism

ascetic
(adj.) practicing restraint as a means of self-discipline, usually religious (The priest lives an ascetic life devoid of television, savory foods, and

other pleasures.)

Want to live an ascetic lifestyle? Then you better ditch the flat panel TV and fuzzy slippers. To be ascetic, you learn to live without; it’s all about

self-denial.

Ascetic is derived from the Greek asketes, meaning “monk,” or “hermit.” Later that became asketikos, meaning “rigorously self-disciplined,” which gives us

the Modern English ascetic. Ascetic can be a noun: a person with incredible self-discipline and the ability to deprive herself, or an adjective that

describes such a people or their lifestyle.

asceticism doctrine that self-denial of the body permits spiritual enlightenment

ascham box for keeping bows and arrows dry

ascian inhabitant of the equatorial zone

aseity – self-origination

Aseity self-origination

ashlar squared stone used in building walls

ashplant walking stick

asinine of, like or pertaining to asses; stupid

asitia lack of appetite

askefise one who blows on ashes to bring them to flame

asomatous lacking a body; incorporeal

asonia deafness to specific pitches of sound

asperge to sprinkle

aspergilliform shaped like a brush

aspergillum vessel for sprinkling holy water

asperity roughness of surface or sound

asperse slander; disparage

aspersed in heraldry, covered with an indefinite number of small figures

Aspersion aspersions – Something that is said which attacks another person’s character or reputation; remarks that are slanderous, damaging, or defamatory

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Aspersion is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/aspersion-a-curse-expression-of-ill-will/


aspersory vessel for holding holy water

aspheterism denial of the right to private property

aspidate shield-shaped

aspidomancy divination by sitting and chanting within a circle

asportation – to carry property away wrongfully

Asportation to carry property away wrongfully

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Asportation is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/asportation-to-carry-property-away-wrongfully/

assart to reclaim for agriculture by clearing away trees

assecuration marine insurance

assentation insincere or glib assent

asseveration positive or earnest affirmation

assibilate to pronounce with a hiss or sibilant

assiduity persevering application to a pursuit

assiduous
(adj.) hard-working, diligent (The construction workers erected the skyscraper during two years of assiduous labor.)
If you call someone assiduous, it’s a compliment. It means they’re careful, methodical and very persistent. Good detectives are classically assiduous

types.

Assiduous comes from two Latin words: assiduus, meaning “busy incessant, continual or constant,” and assidere, meaning “to sit down to” something. (Funnily

enough, we also get the word sedentary, meaning someone who doesn’t move around much, a lazy couch potato, from this same last word.) Although we tend to

think of sedentary types as being the very opposite of assiduous ones, many assiduous activities (like writing, thinking, or detective work) are best done

sitting in a chair.

assizer officer or judge in charge of weights and measures

associative indicating association with or accompaniment by

assoil to absolve; to acquit

Assot – to befool; to besot

Assot to befool to besot

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Assot is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/assot-to-befool-to-besot/

assuefaction habituation

assuetude accustomedness; habit

assurgent ascending; rising; curving upward

astacology the science of crayfish

astatic in equilibrium

asteism refined irony

asterism cluster of three asterisks arranged in triangle to draw attention to passage

astern at the stern of a ship

astheniology study of diseases of weakening and aging

asthenopia muscular weakening of the eyes

astichous not in rows

astragal small semicircular moulding; dice

astragalomancy divination using dice or knucklebones

astraphobia fear of being struck by lightning

Astrapophobia fear of thunder and lightning

Astriction – binding obligation

Astriction binding obligation

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Astriction is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/astriction-binding-obligation/

Astringe to draw together; to tighten

astrionics electronics as applied to space flight

astrobleme scar on the earth’s surface from meteorite impact

astrobolism sun-stroke

astrogeology study of extraterrestrial geology

astrognosy knowledge of fixed stars

astrogony theory of the origin of stars

astrolatry worship of stars

astrologaster a foolish or petty astrologer

astromancy divination using stars

astrometeorology study of effect of stars on climate

astrophile person interested in astronomy

astroseismology study of star oscillations

astrut protrudingly; distendedly

asynartetic having two members with different rhythms

asyndeton rhetorical device of omitting conjunctions

atactic irregular

ataraxia tranquility; freedom from anxiety; stoicism

atavism reversion to early or ancestral type

ateknia childlessness

atelier artist’s studio or workshop

ateliosis imperfect development; developmental irregularity

athanasy deathlessness

athanor alchemist’s self-feeding digesting furnace

atheling Anglo-Saxon prince or nobleman

athenaeum literary or scientific association

athermic lacking heat

athetesis rejection of a passage as spurious

athetosis nervous twitching of digits and extremities

athwart across; in opposition to; sideways; transversely

athymia melancholy

atimy loss of honour; disgrace

atlantes male figures used as columns

atlas rich satin fabric

atmatertera great-grandfather’s grandmother’s sister

atmology the science of aqueous vapour

atmometer instrument for measuring evaporating capacity of air

atocia female sterility

atokous lacking offspring

atomism belief that the universe consists of small indivisible particles

atony muscular weakness

atpatruus great-grandfather’s grandfather’s brother

atrabiliary melancholy; hypochondriac

Atrabilious – melancholy; splenetic; acrimonious

Atrabilious Melancholy splenetic acrimonious

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Atrabilious is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/atrabilious-melancholy-splenetic-acrimonious/

atrament blacking; ink; black dye

atresia absence or irregular closure of a passage in the body

atrichia baldness

Atrophy –

Wearing a cast on a broken leg can cause atrophy, or withering, in the leg, because it is immobilized and gets no exercise.

Appearing in English in the 17th century, the word atrophy originally described a lack of nourishment. Atrophy occurs in parts of the body that can’t move

or be “fed” because of disease or injury. It also is used to describe things that go dull through lack of use, like skills in sports or artistic

creativity. The (unrelated) word “trophy” refers to something that sits on a shelf and is admired, while atrophy is a condition of being “shelved,” or made

inactive and lifeless.

atrous jet black

attainder the loss of civil rights for high treason

attaint disgrace; sully; infect; taint

attemper to adapt or alter quality by adding to something

attenuate make thin; reduce in value

atticism expression characterized by conciseness and elegance

attingent touching

attollent lifting up; raising

attorn to transfer to another

attrahent attracting or drawing

attrist to sadden

attrite repentant through fear of punishment

attuition operation between sensation and perception

aubade musical announcement of dawn; sunrise song

aubergine eggplant

aubin horse’s gait between an amble and a gallop

auceps hawker or bird-tender

aucupate to hunt birds; to pursue prey with vigilance

audile person more attuned to sound than the other senses

audiology study of hearing

audiometer instrument for measuring acuity of hearing

audiophile one who loves accurately reproduced recorded sound

audism belief that people who can hear are superior to people who are deaf

augean filthy; difficult

augend number to which another number is added

aught at all

aularian of, like or pertaining to a hall in a university

aulete flautist

aulic courtly; ceremonious; genteel

auncel crude balance for weighing

aurantiaceous of, like or pertaining or pertaining to oranges or orange trees

aureity property of being golden in colour or substance

aureole radiant light around head or body of holy personage

auricomous having golden or blond hair

auricular of, like or pertaining to the ear; spoken secretly

auriferous bearing gold

aurifex goldsmith

auriform shaped like an ear

aurigation charioteering

aurigraphy writing or engraving in gold

aurilave instrument for cleaning the ear

auriphrygia gold embroidery

auriscope instrument for examining the ear

aurochs extinct wild ox

aurulent gold-coloured

auscultation listening to sounds arising within organs

auslaut final sound of a word or syllable

austringer keeper of goshawks

austromancy divination using wind

autarchy government by an absolute ruler

autarkic self-sufficient; independent

autecology study of ecology of one species

autocephality ecclesiastical self-government

autocide killing of oneself; suicide

autocide killing of oneself or another by means of a motor vehicle

autocoprophagy eating one’s own feces

autocracy government by one individual

auto-da-fe burning of a heretic

Autodidact – self-taught person

Autodidact self-taught man

Short Story describing the meaning of the word Autodidact is at

https://satgrecatvocabulary.wordpress.com/autodidact-self-taught-man/

autogenesis spontaneous generation

autognosis knowledge of or about oneself

autography writing in one’s own hand

autolatry self-worship

autology scientific study of oneself

automorphism ascription to others of one’s own characteristics

automysophobia fear of being dirty

autonym a writer’s real name; work published under writer’s own name

autophagy feeding on body’s own tissues

autophanous self-luminous

autophobia fear of solitude

autoschediasm anything extemporized

autosoterism belief that one can obtain salvation through oneself

autotelic being an end in itself

autothaumaturgist person pretending to be mystical or mysterious

autotheism belief that one is God incarnate or that one is Christ

autotropic growing in a straight line

auxanometer instrument for measuring growth of plants

auxesis increase in size; hyperbole or augmentation of meaning

auxology science of growth

auxometer instrument for measuring magnifying power

aval of, like or pertaining to a grandparent

Avaricious – Immoderately desirous of acquiring e.g. wealth

prehensile-avaricious-covetous-grabby-grasping

avalement allowing knees to flex while skiing

avaunt away; hence; to boast

aveniform shaped like oats

aventail movable front of a helmet

averruncate to ward off; to uproot

averruncator pole for pruning trees

aversant in heraldry, with a hand turned towards the back

avicide killing of birds

avicular of, like or pertaining to birds

avinosis air sickness

avionics the science of electronic devices for aircraft

avital ancestral

avizandum private consideration of a case by a judge

avocet long-legged wading bird with upward-curving bill

avolitional involuntary

avulse to pluck or tear away by force

avuncular like an uncle; of, like or pertaining to uncles

awn beard or similar bristly growth on stalk of grain

axilla armpit

axiniform shaped like an axe-head

axinomancy divination using an axe or hatchet

axiology the science of the ultimate nature of values

axolotl salamander dwelling in mountainous lakes

aye-aye nocturnal lemur-like animal of Madagascar

azimuth arc of the horizon

azoth alchemical name for mercury

azuline blue

azure light or sky blue; the heraldic colour blue

azymous unleavened

Abject – If it reeks of humiliation or looks like the lowest of lows, then you can safely describe it as abject. The pronunciation of abject is up for debate: you can decide whether to stress the first or the second syllable. But what’s more important is understanding how extreme this adjective is. Abject means absolutely miserable, the most unfortunate, with utter humiliation. You might have heard the phrase abject poverty, which is the absolute worst, most hopeless level of poverty you’ve ever seen.

Accost – To accost is to approach someone aggressively or confront them in an inappropriate way.

Accost describes a confrontation — one that’s often aggressive in nature. You’re likely to be accosted by angry picketers if you wear your finest fur coat to a march against animal cruelty. The paparazzi make their living by accosting celebrities, pushing in close to snap candid photos as the stars leave their limos. The drunk man who accosts his attractive female co-worker at a company cocktail party is looking for more than conversation.

accost to approach someone aggressively

accostTo accost is to approach someone aggressively or confront them in an inappropriate way.

Accost describes a confrontation — one that’s often aggressive in nature. You’re likely to be accosted by angry picketers if you wear your finest fur coat to a march against animal cruelty. The paparazzi make their living by accosting celebrities, pushing in close to snap candid photos as the stars leave their limos. The drunk man who accosts his attractive female co-worker at a company cocktail party is looking for more than conversation.

to approach and speak to (someone) often in an angry, aggressive, or unwanted way. to approach and speak to often in a challenging or aggressive way.

He was accosted by three gang members on the subway.
She was so famous that people would accost her on the street and ask for an autograph.
Middle French accoster, ultimately from Latin ad- + costa rib, side.

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accretion – The process of increasing can be called accretion. Although you may say that stalactites “grow” from the ceilings of caves, they actually form from an accretion of limestone and other minerals.

So what’s the difference between an addition and an accretion? Addition implies adding to something that already exists, such as an addition to the cast (when a new actor joins an existing show). The noun accretion, on the other hand, implies an accumulation that causes increase, such as “an accretion of frost on the windows” or “an accretion of plaque on your teeth.” The latter, of course, is why the dentist always begs you to floss and brush.

acerbic – (adj.) biting, bitter in tone or taste (Jill became extremely acerbic and began to cruelly make fun of all her friends.)

acrimony – (n.) bitterness, discord (Though they vowed that no girl would ever come between them, Biff and Trevor could not keep acrimony from overwhelming their friendship after they both fell in love with the lovely Teresa.)

acumen – (n.) keen insight (Because of his mathematical acumen, Larry was able to figure out in minutes problems that took other students hours.)

admonish – To admonish is to scold. If you want to show someone you’re not happy with his behavior, admonish him. It sounds better than “scolding,” and it’s less painful than spanking.

Coming to English through Old French from the Latin admonere “to advise, remind,” admonish is always used with an eye on improving someone’s behavior. The exact meaning of this formal verb varies in intensity depending generally on who is being corrected. If a child or subordinate is being admonished, it means “scold” or “rebuke” whereas if someone admonishes a person with equal standing, warn or advise are closer synonyms.

adumbrate – (v.) to sketch out in a vague way (The coach adumbrated a game plan, but none of the players knew precisely what to do.)

To adumbrate something is to outline it. In an English essay, you could adumbrate the themes in a novel; or, in a letter to Santa, you could adumbrate all the ways you have been behaving.

Adumbrate is built on the Latin root umbra, “shade,” and the image it evokes is of a shadow being cast around something. Your outline is like a shadow of something bigger — like the themes in that novel or the ways you have been behaving. You can also use adumbrate to mean “foreshadow”: “The scene where the princess dreams of the vampire adumbrates her later discovery that her little brother is, in fact, a vampire.”

aggrandize – If you are a window washer, but you refer to yourself as a “vista enhancement specialist,” then you are aggrandizing your job title — that is, making it sound greater than it is.

The verb aggrandize not only means “to make appear greater”; it can also be used to mean simply “to make greater.” If you buy an estate and sink millions of dollars into its improvement, then you are actually aggrandizing the estate. If you are making yourself seem greater, then people may say you are “self-aggrandizing.”

alacrity – (n.) eagerness, speed (For some reason, Chuck loved to help his mother whenever he could, so when his mother asked him to set the table, he did so with alacrity.)

Someone with alacrity shows cheerful willingness and eager behavior, like a kid whose mother has told him he can buy anything in a candy store.

While the noun alacrity normally refers to someone’s peppy behavior, it can also describe a certain mood or tempo of a musical composition, indicating how the music should be played. Alacrity comes from the Latin alacritas, and the Italian musical term allegro is a near relation.

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ambivalent – If you can’t decide how you feel about something, declare yourself ambivalent about it. Ambivalent means “having mixed feelings about something.” A Swiss psychologist named Eugen Bleuler coined the German word Ambivalenz in the early twentieth century, and it was soon imported into English. Bleuler combined the Latin prefix ambi-, meaning “both,” with valentia, “strength.” So etymologically speaking, if you’re ambivalent you’re being pulled by two equally strong things — but in practice, ambivalence often arises from caring very little either way. You might feel ambivalent about your lunch options if you have to choose between a murky stew and flavorless tofu.

Amenable – If your friends want to try sky diving and you’re amenable to the idea, sounds like you’re going to be jumping out of a plane. If a person or thing is amenable to something, they are ready, willing, or responsive.

Note that amenable is often followed by the preposition to, which makes amenable mean “able to be controlled or affected by something,” as in “They are usually amenable to our wishes;” or “Her heart condition is not amenable to treatment.” An amenable personality is open to influence or control and is willing to agree or yield.

antediluvian – Antediluvian means “before the flood” — that is, the Biblical flood with Noah’s ark. Generally, though, the word is used — often humorously — to describe something really, really old.

In popular language, antediluvian is almost always used to exaggerate how comically, ridiculously old and out-of-date something is. You may laugh at your parents’ antediluvian ideas of what’s proper for going out on a date. And how about those antediluvian computers they still insist are fine! When the word was coined in the seventeenth century, however, it was meant literally. Back then, the science of reconstructing the Earth’s history used the Bible as a frame of reference.

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antipathy – (n.) a strong dislike, repugnance (I know you love me, but because you are a liar and a thief, I feel nothing but antipathy for you.)

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apocryphal – Urban legends — stories about phantom hitchhikers, deep-fried rats, and spider eggs in bubblegum — are classic examples of apocryphal tales. They’re told as if they’re true, but no one can ever identify their origins.

Today, any dubious or unverifiable story may be dismissed as apocryphal. If it can’t be verified, it is seen as not real, true or authentic. Originally, however, apocryphal was reserved for religious writings that were not included in the Torah or the New Testament of the Bible because the divinity of the texts was not certain. These texts are knows as the Apocrypha and are included in the Septuagint (a Greek version of the Hebrew Bible) and the Vulgate (a Latin Bible edited in the 4th century).

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approbation – (n.) praise (The crowd welcomed the heroes with approbation.)

Approbation is an official, important-sounding, and somewhat old-fashioned word for approval or praise. A princess, for example, might only consider marrying a prince that is met with her father’s, the King’s, approbation.

How is it possible that approbation means approval when probation is a form of being in trouble in school? Remember that probation is a testing period, to see if you can be good. Approbation means it’s all good. Or you can remember this rhyme: “Filled with approbation, the audience gave a standing ovation.”

archetypal – An archetypal thing represents an original type after which other, similar things are patterned. With her green skin, black garb, and evil ways, the Wicked Witch of the West is an archetypal villain.

The main characters in Romeo and Juliet are the archetypal “star-crossed lovers” — we often think of them first, and use them as examples. Similarly, Superman, with his chiseled looks, herculean strength, and good conscience, is an archetypal superhero. (Contrast him with Wolverine, whose retracting claws, violent outbursts, and brooding make him an archetypal “anti-hero.”)

arrogate – (v.) to take without justification (The king arrogated the right to order executions to himself exclusively.)

To arrogate is to take over. When the teacher steps out of the classroom and some bossy girl marches up to the front chalkboard? What she’s trying to do is arrogate the teacher’s authority to herself.

When someone takes control of something, often without permission, such as when a military general assumes the power of a country’s government after getting rid of the previous leader, they arrogate power or control to themselves. Occasionally the verb arrogate means something like “assert one’s right to,” or take something that is deserved, but more often it implies a taking by force

ascetic – (adj.) practicing restraint as a means of self-discipline, usually religious (The priest lives an ascetic life devoid of television, savory foods, and other pleasures.)

Want to live an ascetic lifestyle? Then you better ditch the flat panel TV and fuzzy slippers. To be ascetic, you learn to live without; it’s all about self-denial.

Ascetic is derived from the Greek asketes, meaning “monk,” or “hermit.” Later that became asketikos, meaning “rigorously self-disciplined,” which gives us the Modern English ascetic. Ascetic can be a noun: a person with incredible self-discipline and the ability to deprive herself, or an adjective that describes such a people or their lifestyle.

aspersion – (n.) a curse, expression of ill-will (The rival politicians repeatedly cast aspersions on each others’ integrity.)

An aspersion is a disparaging remark. It almost invariably appears as a plural, following the word “cast” — when you cast aspersions on someone, you are questioning their abilities or doubting them.

Finding out that a field-hockey coach had never played the sport might cast aspersions on her ability to coach it. Wendy’s ads don’t come out and say that McDonald’s hamburgers are made out of cardboard, but through shot after shot of their own thick and juicy and oddly square offering, they cast aspersions on the quarter-pounder.

Aspersion a curse expression of ill-will

assiduous – (adj.) hard-working, diligent (The construction workers erected the skyscraper during two years of assiduous labor.)

If you call someone assiduous, it’s a compliment. It means they’re careful, methodical and very persistent. Good detectives are classically assiduous types.

Assiduous comes from two Latin words: assiduus, meaning “busy incessant, continual or constant,” and assidere, meaning “to sit down to” something. (Funnily enough, we also get the word sedentary, meaning someone who doesn’t move around much, a lazy couch potato, from this same last word.) Although we tend to think of sedentary types as being the very opposite of assiduous ones, many assiduous activities (like writing, thinking, or detective work) are best done sitting in a chair.

Atrophy – Wearing a cast on a broken leg can cause atrophy, or withering, in the leg, because it is immobilized and gets no exercise.

Appearing in English in the 17th century, the word atrophy originally described a lack of nourishment. Atrophy occurs in parts of the body that can’t move or be “fed” because of disease or injury. It also is used to describe things that go dull through lack of use, like skills in sports or artistic creativity. The (unrelated) word “trophy” refers to something that sits on a shelf and is admired, while atrophy is a condition of being “shelved,” or made inactive and lifeless.

Axinomancy – divination by means of the movements of an ax placed on a post. An ancient means of determining guilt, axinomancy involved balancing an ax on a post, and reading a list of names aloud. If the ax moved at a particular name, that person was deemed guilty.

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